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Stinger Cocktail Recipe

Stinger Cocktail Recipe


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3.57143

7 ratings

March 4, 2011

By

Ray Foley

A very drinkable mix of cognac and white crème de menthe.

1

Servings

Related Recipes

Ingredients

  • 1 ¾ ounces cognac
  • ¼ ounce white crème de menthe
  • Ice

Directions

Combine all of the ingredients together in a shaker and shake well. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Tags


Stinger

  1. Combine all ingredients over ice and stir thoroughly, 20-30 seconds
  2. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass over a large cube

Instagram is a great way to get updates on new cocktails and keep up with everyone’s favorite redheads

In the early 1900’s, the stinger was a popular high society drink, even if it wasn't really thought of as a cocktail under the nomenclature of the time. As David Wondrich notes in Imbibe, the drink might be most famously associated with Reginald Vanderbilt, who himself is probably most famously associated with the absurdly rich family he was born into. Reginald never really worked in the traditional sense, and spent most of his time gambling, frequenting turf clubs, and drinking his favorite drink: the stinger, which he would mix at his home bar for visitors every day during cocktail hour. He purportedly spent 25 million dollars over 14 reckless years, an unbelievable sum given the time. Reginald’s second claim to fame, along with the stinger of course, is his second daughter Gloria. She would find toddler fame in the 1930s as the subject of a highly publicized custody battle (her trust fund was involved) and later as a model and fashion designer.

As the Vanderbilt fortune faded over the century, so did the reputation of the stinger, which is now largely a forgotten drink. This is a shame, because this simple diddy is a great way to enjoy the expressive and enlivening flavors of creme de menthe. The flavor profile is mostly about mint, but brandy comes through with a bit of fruit and backbone. We like to add a couple dashes of absinthe to this drink, inspired by Trader Vic’s Stinger Royale. We think it subdues the creme de menthe a bit and helps redact notions of a one-ingredient show. Like fernet-forward drinks such as the Toronto and apotheke, the stinger is bracing and brash it pulls no punches, but works excellently as a pick-me-up or digestif. Because this recipe centers primarily around mint, make sure to use a good creme de menthe. We like the Tempus Fugit variety, but have also heard good things about Giffard Menthe-Pastille. Whatever you do, please avoid anything green.

The Tuxedo No.2 email list sends a yummy cocktail to your inbox every friday. No spam. No junk. Just tasty.


The Stinger Recipe

Let's get this weekend started right. And since it's a day off for many people out there, let's kick it off a bit early today. Here's a cocktail recipe from Paul Clarke (The Cocktail Chronicles) to get things going. Need more than one after yesterday? Here you go. Cheers!

While retailers started gearing up for the season weeks ago, now that Thanksgiving is over it's one long sprint to Christmas. Shopping malls opened at midnight in the suburbs around my Seattle home, and some crowds had been gathering since early Thursday morning. Without delving into news from around the country - really, checking out what's happening at the malls in Des Moines isn't my idea of a good time--I'm sure the story was repeated nationwide.

Whether you're settling in after a long day of shopping, or letting the swarm blow past you while biding your time until closer to the holiday, the dawn of the Christmas season calls for some refreshment. The Stinger isn't a seasonal cocktail, per se, but its crisp minty snap always puts me in the right frame of mind for the festive weeks to come.

While early recipes call for two parts brandy to one part crème de menthe, many contemporary palates find that way too sweet a more brandy-heavy 4:1 ratio is much easier to handle. And while brandy is traditional, the stinger is comfortable with other spirits: I'm quite fond of substituting bourbon for the brandy, and rum works well, as does vodka, so I'm told - technically that's called a White Spider, though I doubt you've heard anyone call it much of anything lately. However you choose to fix yours, be sure to make a toast to the long holiday season ahead.


Stinger Cocktail Recipe - Recipes

Stinger

* 2 ounces Cognac
* 1 ounce white crème de menthe

Shake ingredients in an ice filled shaker until cold. Strain into an old fashioned glass filled with crushed ice.

This drink breaks with the convention that spirits-only cocktails are stirred rather than shaken. For whatever reason, tradition dictates that the Stinger is shaken, so that’s how we’ll make them here. Crushed ice is also essential crush ice by filling a ziploc or other bag with ice and hammering it with the handle of your muddler (or just use an ice crusher, if you want to get fancy).

The Stinger is a semi-old school cocktail the recipe itself is pre-prohibition but it’s most often associated with the 1950s-60s when it was the standard New York nightcap. This recipe, taken from Dale Degroff’s The Craft of the Cocktail, is the generally accepted one, but it’s much too sweet for my tastes. Adjust the ratio of the ingredients until you find a balance that appeals to you. I suggest halving the amount of crème de menthe for this amount of Cognac, but try it out and see what works for you.

I didn’t have any crème de menthe on hand at home when I decided to make some of these and I also realized I was almost out of Cognac, so I picked up both bottles together. The older woman at my local liquor store (11th Ave Liquor in SE Portland), seeing what I was buying, said “Don’t tell me you’re making Stingers…” . When I told her that yes, I was planning to, she told me I’m much to young to know about them. Although I don’t look my actual age, it’s true that I missed the Stinger’s heyday by a good while. But compared to my usual cocktail fare, the Stinger is a relative newcomer.

I served these to Sarai with some thick, chewy oatmeal cookies from Smitten Kitchen (I used blueberries instead of raisins).


The Stinger Recipe

Let's get this weekend started right. And since it's a day off for many people out there, let's kick it off a bit early today. Here's a cocktail recipe from Paul Clarke (The Cocktail Chronicles) to get things going. Need more than one after yesterday? Here you go. Cheers!

While retailers started gearing up for the season weeks ago, now that Thanksgiving is over it's one long sprint to Christmas. Shopping malls opened at midnight in the suburbs around my Seattle home, and some crowds had been gathering since early Thursday morning. Without delving into news from around the country - really, checking out what's happening at the malls in Des Moines isn't my idea of a good time--I'm sure the story was repeated nationwide.

Whether you're settling in after a long day of shopping, or letting the swarm blow past you while biding your time until closer to the holiday, the dawn of the Christmas season calls for some refreshment. The Stinger isn't a seasonal cocktail, per se, but its crisp minty snap always puts me in the right frame of mind for the festive weeks to come.

While early recipes call for two parts brandy to one part crème de menthe, many contemporary palates find that way too sweet a more brandy-heavy 4:1 ratio is much easier to handle. And while brandy is traditional, the stinger is comfortable with other spirits: I'm quite fond of substituting bourbon for the brandy, and rum works well, as does vodka, so I'm told - technically that's called a White Spider, though I doubt you've heard anyone call it much of anything lately. However you choose to fix yours, be sure to make a toast to the long holiday season ahead.


From Punch (http://punchdrink.com)

Ingredients
  • 1 3/4 ounces Cognac, preferably Gourry de Chadeville overproof
  • 3/4 ounce créme de menthe, preferably Giffard Menthe-Pastille
  • 1 dash absinthe, preferably Germain-Robin
Directions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass over ice and stir until chilled.
  2. Strain into a chilled coupe over a large piece of ice.
  3. Express a lemon peel over the surface of the drink and discard.

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After-Dinner Drinks: The Stinger

Some after-dinner drinks double as desserts. Others, like Italy's amaros and other digestivos, help settle your stomach. The classic Stinger cocktail offers a little of both.

A simple, elegant marriage of white crème de menthe and brandy, the Stinger delivers an invigorating one-two hit of digestion-aiding mint and a sweet finish. This cocktail isn't for everyone if the mint sounds off-putting to you, it might taste that way, too.

But to many of us, the first sip of a Stinger tastes surprisingly oh-so-right, a strange yet captivating combo that gracefully concludes a heavy meal. Get the classic cocktail recipe.


From Punch (http://punchdrink.com)

Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 ounces Tempus Fugit Crème de Menthe
  • 1 1/2 ounces Cognac, preferably VS or VSOP
  • 1/4 ounce navy strength gin, preferably Plymouth

Garnish: mint leaf (optional)

Directions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass over ice and stir until chilled.
  2. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.
  3. Garnish with a mint leaf.

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How to Make a Boilermaker

*You can depth charge the entire shot glass into the beer, or pour out the liquor into the beer. Dealer's choice.

We love to make a cocktail here at Esquire. A Rob Roy in wintertime? Great. A Last Word when we're feeling funky, and a Brain-Duster when we're feeling full-tilt weird? Absolutely. But from where I'm sitting today, on a Friday at home in social isolation, when the dust is collecting on the bottles at the bars that are all closed up, what really sounds good is a shot in one glass and a beer in another&mdasha Boilermaker. In a perfect world, it'd be from the no-nonsense dive down the street. In the world we've got right now, I'll make do on my own. It's not like it's a hard drink to master.

There are two ways to do a Boilermaker. The first asks you to slam a shot of whiskey then drink a beer, while the second has you dunking your shot of whiskey into your beer, then chugging that. Both are efficient and neither is wrong (although for the sake of taste, you might want to keep them separate). Then, like nicotine in your blood or a bucket of cold water to the face, you're feeling more alive than you did however long it took you to down the beer ago. The alcohol is only a part of it. The physicality of a Boilermaker&mdashthat vigorous arm motion, the slamming of the glassware, that gasp for air afterwards&mdashis what gets you flying.

That's not to say that the Boilermaker, much like the Pickleback, hasn't been adopted by finer establishments and roped into elevated pairings of top shelf whiskey and craft microbrews, like wine and stinky cheese. These'll challenge your taste buds, and you'd absolutely be in the right to sip each slowly and alternately, instead of shooting them. Nor are bars limiting themselves to whiskey. The Boilermaker bar in New York, for example, pairs pilsner with mezcal, and raspberry sour ale with Campari. Take that as an invitation to use whatever-the-hell bottle in the kitchen for your own.

The Boilermaker started out as a nothing-fancy drink consumed by blue collar workers after a factory shift some 200 years ago. It remains, at its core, a drink best drunk shoulder-to-shoulder along the bar at a local joint. When heading down the block is out of the question, a Boilermaker is all the more necessary to remind us of those better nights amongst strangers and friends alike. And, we gotta admit, it complements the desperate mood of the hour. As far as whiskey-and-beer pairings go, here are a few recommendations, although there is quite literally no way to mess this one up. Repeat as necessary.


Watch the video: How to make The Stinger Cocktail - Pre-Prohibition (July 2022).


Comments:

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