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Pan-fried sole fillets recipe

Pan-fried sole fillets recipe



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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Seafood
  • Fish
  • Flatfish
  • Sole

This is one of my greatest pleasures. I get sole caught in the night market and I make it in the 'day market' of my kitchen! They are so fresh that the skin is crispy. Some people like to remove the skin, but what a pity - it's so good!

39 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 4 sole fillets
  • 1 knob salted butter
  • 1 lemon, juiced (optional just before serving)

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:20min

  1. Rinse sole and dab with kitchen paper to dry.
  2. Brown the butter in a large frying pan and add the sole fillets.They ought not be too tight in the pan (if necessary do two rounds of cooking).
  3. Pan fry over low heat for about 7 minutes per side. To see if the fish is cooked, take a knife and remove the fillet from the backbone; if the edge is pink, cook for a few more minutes. When the edge is white the sole is ready.
  4. Squeeze lemon juice into the pan just before serving, if desired.

Tip

My grandmother dredged the fish in a bit of flour before cooking, so that the skin wouldn't come off of the fillets.

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Recipe Summary

  • 2 teaspoons red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon seafood seasoning (such as Old Bay®)
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 4 (4 ounce) fillets swai fish
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • ¼ cup water

Combine red pepper flakes, seafood seasoning, garlic powder, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Spread corn meal into a shallow bowl. Season swai fish with red pepper flake mixture and press each fillet into cornmeal to coat. Wrap coated fillets in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Unwrap fish and place in the hot oil cook until browned, about 5 minutes per side. Add water, bring to a simmer, cover, and cook, flipping occasionally, until fish flakes easily with a fork, about 10 minutes.


How to make Parmesan Crusted Sole:

  1. Pat the fillets dry with paper towels and place on a plate.
  2. Break the eggs into a shallow dish or pie plate and lightly beat them with a fork.
  3. In another shallow dish, combine the cheese, paprika, lemon zest, salt and pepper.
  4. Working with one fillet at a time, dip the fish into the egg wash then into the Parmesan mixture.
  5. Press the mixture firmly to the fish to get an even coating on each side of the fish.
  6. Place the fish on a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  7. Repeat with the remaining fillets.
  8. With the oven set on broil and preheated, transfer the baking sheet to the middle rack of the oven and broil the fish 3-4 minutes . The fillets are thin and it is not necessary to flip them.
  9. Serve with a scattering of rinsed capers, snipped chives and lemon wedges.

Directions

  1. Season the fish with salt on both sides then dip into flour, shaking off the excess.
  2. Whisk the eggs then pour into a shallow dish.
  3. Heat a large frying pan until hot, then use tongs to dip the fish into the egg, completely coating the fillets on both sides.
  4. Add the butter to the pan, allow to melt, then add the fish. Cook until golden on both sides and serve on hot plates with wedges of lemon and simple butter sauce (see below).

Simple butter sauce for the fish

Once the fish is out of the pan, add an extra Tbsp butter, cook until it begins to bubble and go brown, add 1 Tbsp lemon juice and 1 Tbsp chopped parsley, some freshly ground pepper (capers are also great) and spoon over the cooked fish.


Pan-fried sole fillets recipe - Recipes

Add the clams, pop the lid on and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, strain into a bowl keeping all the juices, then pop the juices back into the pan and reduce by ½.

Meanwhile, place the sole onto a tray, dot with butter then bake for three to four minutes, season.

Saute the samphire in butter for a minute or two. Spoon the sauce onto a plate then top with fish.

Back to the sauce, add the cream and a knob of butter then pick the clams from the shells and pop in the sauce.

Heat a large pan until hot. Pop in the shallot, wine and tarragon.

Add the clams, pop the lid on and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, strain into a bowl keeping all the juices, then pop the juices back into the pan and reduce by ½.

Meanwhile, place the sole onto a tray, dot with butter then bake for three to four minutes, season.

Saute the samphire in butter for a minute or two. Spoon the sauce onto a plate then top with fish.

Back to the sauce, add the cream and a knob of butter then pick the clams from the shells and pop in the sauce.

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Ingredients

  • 400g clams
  • 1 shallot peeled and sliced
  • Small bunch of tarragon
  • 15g butter
  • 100ml double cream
  • 100ml white wine
  • 100g samphire
  • Squeeze of lemon juice

Method

Add the clams, pop the lid on and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, strain into a bowl keeping all the juices, then pop the juices back into the pan and reduce by ½.

Meanwhile, place the sole onto a tray, dot with butter then bake for three to four minutes, season.

Saute the samphire in butter for a minute or two. Spoon the sauce onto a plate then top with fish.

Back to the sauce, add the cream and a knob of butter then pick the clams from the shells and pop in the sauce.

Heat a large pan until hot. Pop in the shallot, wine and tarragon.

Add the clams, pop the lid on and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, strain into a bowl keeping all the juices, then pop the juices back into the pan and reduce by ½.

Meanwhile, place the sole onto a tray, dot with butter then bake for three to four minutes, season.

Saute the samphire in butter for a minute or two. Spoon the sauce onto a plate then top with fish.

Back to the sauce, add the cream and a knob of butter then pick the clams from the shells and pop in the sauce.


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Leave a comment about this recipe or ask a question?

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I pop in all the time as well, to chat and to answer questions. 

Meet with us around Oma's table , pull up a chair, grab a coffee and a piece of Apfelstrudel, and enjoy the visit.


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Preparation

1. To fillet the fish, cut around the back of the head, down to the backbone, using a sharp, thin-bladed, flexible knife. Then make a cut down the center of the fish, from head to tail. 2. Starting at the head, slide the knife under one fillet and carefully cut it away, keeping the blade as flat and as close to the bones as possible. Remove the adjacent fillet, then turn the fish over and repeat. 3. Lay the fillet skin-side down, with the narrowest end facing you. Hold the tip of the skin with your fingers and, angling the blade of the knife down toward the skin and working it away from you, start to cut between the flesh and the skin. Firmly take hold of the skin and continue to work away from you, sawing the knife from side to side, keeping the blade close against the skin until the fillet is released. 4. Trim the frills away from the edge of the skin less fillet to give it a neat finish. 5. Slice the fillets diagonally into goujons about the thickness of your little finger. 6. For the salsa verde mayonnaise, coarsely chop the parsley, mint, capers, anchovy fillets, and garlic all together, then mix with the mayonnaise, mustard, lemon juice, and salt. 7. Heat some oil for deep-frying to 375°F (190°C). Work the ciabatta in a food processor into fine breadcrumbs. Season the fish fillets with a little salt and pepper, then coat each one with flour, then beaten egg, and then breadcrumbs. 8. Deep-fry the fish, two pieces at a time, for about 2 minutes, until crisp and golden. Drain on paper towels and keep warm while you fry the remaining fish. Serve straight away, with the salsa verde mayonnaise and some lemon wedges. Cooks' note: ALTERNATIVE FISH:
Sole, cod, haddock, or Australian flathead fillets.

Pan-fried Dover sole with warm tomato compote

Make the compote. Heat the oil in a large, non-stick frying pan, then sizzle the shallots for 2 mins until starting to soften. Season with salt, pepper and the sugar. Add the tomatoes, then cook for 2-3 mins over a high heat until they start to release their juice. Drizzle over the vinegar, bubble for a few mins, turn off the heat, then scatter over the coriander. Transfer to a plate.

Now start the fish. With a large chef’s knife, cut off the head just past the gill (you can use this for stock). Using a pair of kitchen scissors, trim away the frills from either side of the fish. Squeeze out any roe from the cavity then pick out and wash away any blood. Pat dry with kitchen paper. You will now have a trimmed slipper-shaped fish ready to be pan-fried.

In a large, shallow dish mix the flour with cayenne pepper and season with salt. Dip each fish in the seasoned flour to completely coat, then pat off the excess. Set the fish aside.

Heat the oil in a large, non-stick frying pan until hot. Place the floured fish in the pan, skinned side down. Shake the pan a little, then cook the fish, undisturbed, for about 4 mins until golden brown.

Using a fish slice, carefully turn the fish over, then continue to cook on the underside for 2-3 mins until it has shrunk and is starting to come away from the bone. Add the pieces of butter to the outside of the pan and let them sizzle into the oil.

Fry the fish for another 2-3 mins, constantly spooning the buttery oil over it to finish the cooking and keep it moist.

Squeeze the lemon half through your fingers over the fish and cook for about 30 secs longer. Remove from the heat, then rest the fish in the pan for 2 mins.

To remove the bones, sit the fish on a board, skinned side up. Run a fine fish slice or filleting knife down the natural line in the centre of the fish. Push the fillets away from bone, but leave them attached to the outside of the fish. Working from the head end of the fish, slowly pull the main skeleton out, easing the fillets aside as the bone comes loose. Carefully push the fillets back to reform so it resembles the whole fish again.

Serve on a large plate with the tomatoes and some buttered new potatoes.

RECIPE TIPS

If Dover sole is too expensive or not available, use lemon sole or the smaller sand soles, but don’t take it off the bone before serving as the flesh will be softer and fall apart.

I serve little waxy potatoes such as Ratte, Charlotte or Pink Fir Apple with Dover sole. For maximum flavour, boil them in their skins. After cooking, cool and peel them, then reheat in melted butter mixed with a splash of water.

Dover sole can vary in size. A 300g-400g fish is the perfect portion for one. A much larger one will serve two – as the flesh will be thicker you will need to cook it for a few minutes longer on each side. Ask your fishmonger to remove the dark top skin from the soles.


Is pan fried fish healthy?

First of all, there is a big difference between pan frying at home and eating deep fried foods at a restaurant.

I’m not a big fan of deep fried foods. They frequently contain trans fats and loads of Omega 6 fatty acids that have been heated over and over causing oxidation. These types of fats can cause inflammation.

Pan frying at home is a bit different. You can choose the types of fat you use and it is only heated once, so less oxidation will occur.

I like to use avocado oil for pan frying for three reasons. First, it is loaded with monounsaturated fatty acids. These are the healthy fats found in olive oil and avocados. Secondly, avocado oil holds up incredibly well to high heat. No smoke in the kitchen, and less oxidation with this oil! Finally, I like the clean flavor that complements most savory foods well.

While pan frying at home isn’t perfect, and some oxidation of the oil may occur, I think it’s a much healthier alternative to deep fried restaurant food. For me, eating healthy is all about balance, not perfection.


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